writing

First Line Fridays – Lighthouse Stories

First Line FridaysHere’s another First Line Fridays hosted by Hoarding Books!  It’s a fun way to share good books and spread the love of words on the page.

I got a new book in the mail! The Great Lakes Lighthouse Brides Collection, featuring novellas by  Lena Nelson Dooley, Rebecca Jepson, Carrie Fancett Pagels, Candice Sule Papperson, Kathleen Rouser, Pegg Thomas, and Marilyn Turk.

About the book:

The Great Lakes Lighthouse BridesLighthouses have long been the symbol of salvation, warning sailors away from dangerous rocks and shallow waters.
Along the Great Lakes, America’s inland seas, lighthouses played a vital role in the growth of our nation. They shepherded settlers traveling by water to places that had no roads. These beacons of light required constant tending even in remote and often dangerous places. Brave men and women battled the elements and loneliness to keep the lights shining. Their sacrifice kept goods and immigrants moving. Seven romances set between 1883 and 1911 bring hope to these lonely keepers and love to weary hearts.

First Lines

Anna’s Tower by Pegg Thomas: The wail of a ship’s whistle jerked Anna Wilson from sleep despite the cotton wadding she’d shoved in her ears before bed. 

Beneath a Michigan Moon by Candice Sue Patterson: Ava Ryan walked the shoreline of Lake Huron, enjoying the most beautiful day of the year – until she crossed paths with the devil.

Safe Haven by Rebecca Jepson: Rose Miller tried to silence her grandfather’s warning, but it kept whispering in her mind, an echo that seemed to fill her wintery world with peril.

Love’s Beacon by Carrie Fancett Pagels: Standing alone in the Island Pharmacy, Valerie’s hands shook as she removed the scrap of paper from her reticule.  

The Last Memory by Kathleen Rouser: She struggled to maintain her grip on the splintered wood plank, the only thing keeping her from drowning beneath the roiling waters of Lake Huron. 

The Disappearing Ship by Lena Nelson Dooley: Defeated. The word drummed through Norma Kimbell’s head as she gazed out at the pine forest rushing by the window in a blur.

The Wrong Survivor by Marily Turk: Pausing from her daily lens polishing, Lydia Palmer peered through the windows of the lantern room high above the sapphire-blue water of Lake Superior at the boat heading toward the dock below.

flourishFirst Line Fridays_Hoarding BooksNow it’s your turn! Grab the nearest book (or the book you are reading) and share the first line in the comments. Then head over to Hoarding Books and check out the linky with more First Line participants. 

Have a great weekend!

 

Sherrinda Signature

 

7 thoughts on “First Line Fridays – Lighthouse Stories”

  1. I’m so glad you’re featuring this book. One of the authors is a friend of mine. I haven’t read it yet, but I plan to.

    Today is book launch day for my latest Regency novel, so I’m featuring it on First Line Friday on my blog. However, I am currently reading A Tale of Two Hearts by Michelle Griep. I will share from the third chapter, which is where I’m at. “It was a grisly kind of day.”

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Happy Weekend! My first line is from Wait for Me by Susan May Warren:

    “He wasn’t looking for trouble, but if Pete didn’t act right now, at least one person was going to die.”

    Like

  3. Barbour puts out such good novella collections. I’m sharing from An Unseemly Wife by E.B. Moore on my blog. Here is the first sentence from Chapter 6:

    “On and on, they rode alone through the woods, between the branches, a flaming sun setting thin clouds aglow, until one night the sky cleared to a deep black studded with uncountable white points.”

    Happy Friday!

    Like

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